Network of Professionals

Our Network of Professionals

As a financial advisor, my primary goal is to help you achieve financial clarity. I do this by accessing a network of dedicated professionals, each bringing their unique expertise to the table. Together, we provide personalized advice and services that help you make informed decisions and secure your future.

Financial Advisor

Think of me as your financial coordinator. I help you figure out your goals, create plans to achieve them, and keep everything on track. Whether it’s planning for retirement, managing investments, or saving for a major purchase, I have access to a network of professionals who ensure every aspect of your financial life works together smoothly.

Accountant/Tax Professional

Having an accountant or tax professional in your financial network is essential for keeping your financial records in order. They handle tasks like bookkeeping, preparing financial statements, and assisting with tax planning. Their role is particularly important during tax season. They help you file your taxes accurately and on time, taking the stress out of the process. By optimizing your tax strategies and ensuring everything is reported correctly, they help you save money. Their skills are invaluable for both your immediate needs and long-term financial planning.

Investment Advisor

Investment advisors focus on building and managing investment portfolios tailored to your short-term, medium-term, and long-term goals. They thoroughly research the market, evaluate investment opportunities, and offer valuable insights to help you create a well-rounded portfolio. Whether you’re saving up for a major purchase, planning for retirement, or aiming for other financial milestones, they assist in choosing the right investment vehicles, such as RRSPs, TFSAs, RRIFs, and non-registered accounts, to support your financial stability and future needs.

Life Insurance and Living Benefits Advisor

Life insurance and living benefits advisors are here to help you protect your greatest asset: yourself. Their job is to make sure you and your family are financially secure if unexpected events occur. These advisors walk you through different insurance options, including disability insurance, critical illness insurance, and life insurance, to find the coverage that fits your needs best. By understanding your unique situation and recommending the right policies, they provide you with peace of mind, knowing that you have a safety net in place for life’s uncertainties.

General Insurance Specialist

General insurance specialists cover a wide range of insurance needs, including auto, property, travel, and liability insurance. They assess your risks and recommend policies that provide the protection you need. Their advice helps you understand your options, compare quotes, and select the best policies to safeguard your assets, ensuring you are well-protected in various aspects of your life.

Banker

Bankers are there to help you navigate a wide range of financial services, especially when it comes to getting loans and credit products. They offer advice on securing personal loans, understanding credit options, and managing debt effectively. Whether you’re looking to finance a major purchase, consolidate debt, or build your credit, bankers provide the support and guidance you need to make informed financial decisions.

Mortgage Broker

Mortgage brokers assist you in securing financing for property purchases by accessing multiple lenders on your behalf. They assess your financial situation, compare mortgage products from various sources, and recommend the best options for you. With their ability to shop around and understand different interest rates, loan terms, and application processes, they ensure you get the best possible mortgage deal, making homeownership more accessible and affordable.

Realtor

Realtors are your go-to professionals for buying or selling property. They provide market insights, negotiate deals, and manage the legal aspects of real estate transactions. With their knowledge of local market trends and property values, realtors help you make informed decisions whether you’re purchasing a home, investing in real estate, or selling property.

Legal & Estate Professional

Legal and estate professionals play a vital role in your financial planning by handling the legal side of things, such as estate planning, wills, trusts, and probate. They make sure your assets are distributed according to your wishes and that all the necessary legal documents are properly set up. Their guidance helps you reduce estate taxes and smoothly navigate the legal processes, ensuring your wealth is transferred to future generations just as you intended.

Having a network of financial professionals is essential for achieving financial well-being. Each member brings their own expertise to address different aspects of your finances, from investments and insurance to legal and real estate matters. As your financial advisor, I act as the coordinator, ensuring that all these professionals work together seamlessly. By leveraging their combined knowledge and skills, you can gain financial clarity and know that every aspect of your financial life is taken care of.

Ready to take control of your financial future? Contact us today.

How To Use Insurance To Provide Your Family With Financial Protection

How To Use Insurance To Provide Your Family With Financial Protection

The best way to provide your family with financial protection is with solid insurance planning. These three types of insurance will ensure your family has the financial resources they need if you die, are injured, or become ill:

  • Life insurance.
  • Critical illness insurance.
  • Disability insurance.

Life Insurance

Life insurance is an inexpensive way to ensure your family will have access to a tax-free lump sum payment after your death. Whether you want to give your grandchildren a helping hand getting started in life or provide financial resources for a stay-at-home parent, life insurance can be a great way to do it!

You have two main options when it comes to life insurance – term insurance and permanent life insurance.

With term insurance, you’ve got life insurance coverage for a set period (for example, five years). Premiums for term insurance are lower than for permanent life insurance, but they will rise as you age or your health changes.

With permanent life insurance, you’ve got lifetime coverage. You’ll pay more in premiums at first, but the cost will be less overall than if you buy term insurance for your entire life. Some permanent life insurance policies also allow you to contribute money beyond your premiums, where it can grow tax-free.

Not sure which type is best for you? We can help you figure this out!

Critical Illness Insurance

With critical illness insurance, you will be eligible for a tax-free lump sum of money if you’re diagnosed with a significant illness such as cancer or a stroke. While anyone can benefit from this insurance, it’s essential for self-employed people who don’t have employee benefits to help tide them over while recovering or receiving treatment.

You can spend the lump sum any way you want, including paying off your mortgage, paying for treatment not covered by provincial health care, or putting aside money for your children’s future.

Depending on the type of critical illness policy you select, you may be able to get a “return of premium” option, which means your premiums will be returned to you if you never make a claim. We can explain how to option works and what coverage we think is best for you.

Disability Insurance

Most people assume that they’ll never become disabled. But the stark reality is that 1 in 5 Canadians are considered to be living with a disability. If you couldn’t work anymore because you became disabled, this could have a disastrous impact on your family’s financial stability – especially if you’re self-employed.

With disability insurance, you’ve got financial protection to ensure you can pay your bills and maintain your family’s standard of living. We can explain how to minimize the cost of your premiums while still getting the coverage you need.

Protect Your Family

Book a meeting with us today to get started with insurance planning.

How to Choose and Customize a Group Benefits Plan for Small Businesses

Building a Bright and Sustainable Future Together

As a small business owner, you recognize the significance of looking after your team and fostering a nurturing work environment. One method to demonstrate this is by providing a robust group benefits plan. This not only reflects your dedication to your team’s well-being but also is instrumental in drawing and retaining the best talent. Dive into the realm of group benefits and discover how to select and tailor the ideal plan for your small enterprise.

Understanding the Basics of Group Benefits

Group benefits plans are crafted to offer a variety of health, financial, and wellness advantages to your team members. These packages can encompass health and dental insurance, life and disability insurance, retirement savings alternatives, and more. The main benefit of a group benefits plan is its ability to distribute the risk among your team, making coverage more cost-effective and reachable for all.

Step 1: Assess Your Business Needs

Before diving into a group benefits plan, it’s vital to evaluate the requirements of your business and your team. Ponder over these questions:

  1. What’s the profile of your workforce? Think about age, family composition, and health statuses.
  2. Which benefits are most cherished by your employees? Is it health insurance, dental care, or retirement savings?
  3. How much can you allocate for group benefits? Keep in mind, offering benefits is a commitment to your team’s welfare.

Step 2: Collaborate with a Benefits Specialist

Teaming up with a benefits specialist is akin to having a navigator on your quest to devise the perfect plan. They will assist you in traversing the intricate landscape of insurance choices, rules, and compliance mandates. They’ll engage closely with you to grasp the distinct needs of your business and craft a plan that matches your budget and principles.

Step 3: Customize Your Plan

Adaptability is paramount when shaping a benefits plan that appeals to your team. Here are some avenues for personalization:

  1. Benefit Choices: Opt for a blend of health, dental, vision, life, and disability insurance based on what your team values.
  2. Wellness Initiatives: Mull over introducing wellness programs such as fitness center memberships, mental health resources, and stress alleviation workshops.
  3. Retirement Schemes: Offer retirement savings avenues like a Group RRSP or a staff pension scheme.

Step 4: Educate Your Employees

The efficacy of a group benefits plan hinges on transparent communication and enlightenment. Ensure your team comprehends the worth of the benefits provided and the methods to utilize them optimally. Arrange seminars, online sessions, or informational meetups to aid them in making knowledgeable choices about their coverage.

Step 5: Regularly Review and Adjust

The dynamics of your business and the needs of your team will transform over time. Hence, it’s crucial to revisit your group benefits plan annually and make requisite modifications. This guarantees that your plan stays in sync with your objectives and consistently delivers value to your team.

Building a Sustainable Future Together

As you embark on the path of picking and personalizing a group benefits plan for your small enterprise, bear in mind that your collaboration with your team is central to the process. By placing their welfare at the forefront and presenting a comprehensive benefits package, you’re not merely paving a brighter path for your team but also cultivating a sustainable work setting that promotes allegiance, efficiency, and expansion.

Permanent versus Term Life Insurance – What are the Differences?

Permanent versus Term Life Insurance – What are the Differences?

You know you need life insurance – but you’re not sure which kind is best for you. We can help you with that decision.

There are two main kinds of life insurance:

  • Permanent, which lasts for your entire life.

  • Term, which is only good for a set amount of time.

No matter which type of life insurance you buy – permanent or term – you can rest easy knowing you’ve provided financial protection for your family.

Permanent life insurance

Permanent life insurance is good for your entire life unless you choose to cancel it. It’s an excellent choice to give you peace of mind that you’ll always be covered, even if you develop major health issues later in life.

There are also benefits to having permanent life insurance beyond guaranteed lifelong coverage:

  • You can use the policy to build up a cash value – making it a good choice for low-risk investing.

  • You may be able to use your permanent life insurance policy as collateral for a loan, making it a good choice for business owners.

The main drawback to permanent life insurance policies is that the premiums are often more expensive than term life insurance premiums. If, however, you’re thinking long-term and can afford the premiums, permanent life insurance is a great way to ensure you’re always protected and can have some guaranteed money for your estate.

Term life insurance

Term life insurance is either valid for a set amount of time (such as five or ten years) or until you reach a set age – for example, 60. You should generally be able to renew your life insurance at the end of each term, but your premiums may go up.

Term life insurance premiums are cheaper than permanent life insurance premiums – at least, you are younger and healthier (as the risk of you dying is lower). Your premiums will increase as you age or develop health issues.

You can’t use term life insurance as collateral for a loan or use the policy to build up a cash value. There are lots of benefits to term life insurance, though – it’s a good choice for you if you want low premiums, easy-to-understand insurance, and only need it for a set amount of time – such as while you have a mortgage or young children.

We can help you decide between permanent and term life insurance

If you’re not sure what kind of life insurance is best for you, we can help. We’re happy to talk to you to get more information about your insurance needs. We can then discuss what each type of insurance will cost you and which type of insurance we feel is best for you.

Give us a call today!

Insurance Planning for Incorporated Professionals

For incorporated professionals, making sure your practice is financially protected can be overwhelming. Incorporated professionals face a unique set of challenges when it comes to managing risk. Insurance can play an important role when it comes to reducing the financial impact on your practice in the case of uncontrollable events such as disability, or critical illness. This infographic and article address the importance of corporate insurance.

The 4 areas of insurance a incorporated professional should take care of are: 

  • Health 

  • Disability 

  • Critical Illness 

  • Life

Health: We are fortunate in Canada, where the healthcare system pays for basic healthcare services for Canadian citizens and permanent residents. However, not everything healthcare related is covered, in reality, 30% of our health costs* are paid for out of pocket or through private insurance such as prescription medication, dental, prescription glasses, physiotherapy, etc.

For incorporated professionals, offering employee health benefits make smart business sense because health benefits can form part of a compensation package and can help retain key employees and attract new talent.

For incorporated professionals that are looking to provide alternative health plans in a cost effective manner, you may want to consider a health spending account.

Disability: Most people spend money on protecting their home and car, but many overlook protecting their greatest asset: their ability to earn income. Unfortunately one in three people on average will be disabled for 90 days or more at least once before the age of 65.

Consider the financial impact this would have on your practice if you or a key employee were to suffer from an injury or illness. Disability insurance can provide a monthly income to help keep your practice running.

Business overhead expense insurance can provide monthly reimbursement of expenses during total disability such as rent for commercial space, utilities, employee salaries and benefits, equipment leasing costs, accounting fees, insurance premiums for property and liability, etc.

Key person disability insurance can be used to provide monthly funds for you or key employee while they’re disabled and protect the business from lost revenue while your business finds and trains an appropriate replacement.

Critical Illness: For a lot of us, the idea of experiencing a critical illness such as a heart attack, stroke or cancer can seem unlikely, but almost 3 in 4 (73%) working Canadians know someone who experience a serious illness. Sadly, this can have serious consequences on you, your family and business, with Critical Illness insurance, it provides a lump sum payment so you can focus on your recovery.

Key person critical illness insurance can be used to provide funds to the practice so it can supplement income during time away, cover debt repayment, salary for key employees or fixed overhead expenses.

Buy sell critical illness insurance can provide you with a lump sum payment if your business partner or shareholder were to suffer from a critical illness. These funds can be used to purchase the shares of the partner, fund a buy sell agreement and reassure creditors and suppliers.

Life: For an incorporated professional, not only do your employees depend on you for financial support but your loved ones do too. Life insurance is important because it can protect your practice and also be another form of investment for excess funds.

Key person life insurance can be used to provide a lump sum payment to the practice on death of the insured so it can keep the business going until you an appropriate replacement is found. It can also be used to retain loyal employees by supplying a retirement fund inside the insurance policy.

Loan coverage life insurance can help cover off any outstanding business loans and debts.

Reduce taxes & diversify your portfolio, often life insurance is viewed only as protection, however with permanent life insurance, there is an option to deposit excess funds not needed for operations to provide for tax-free growth (within government limits) to diversify your portfolio and reduce taxes on passive investments.  

Talk to us to make sure you and your practice are protected.

Why Insurance Is So Important If You’re A Single Parent

Why Insurance Is So Important If You’re A Single Parent

Your kids mean everything to you – and you want to make sure they’re protected no matter what. As a single parent, you must have the right health and life insurance options in place to make that happen. We recommend you consider all of the following types of insurance:

  • Disability insurance

  • Critical illness insurance

  • Accident insurance

  • Life insurance

Disability insurance

Disability insurance can provide you with an income if you become disabled and cannot work – whether it’s for a short period of time or a long one.

Most workplaces offer disability coverage, but it’s tied to that particular job, so you’ll lose coverage if you leave that job. As well, the coverage from your employer’s plan may not be sufficient to cover your needs if you become disabled.

It’s particularly important for you to look into disability insurance if you work as a contractor or have a job with no benefits.

Critical illness insurance

Critical illness insurance can help you pay for the costs associated with various serious medical issues (such as a heart attack, cancer, or a stroke) that aren’t covered by any other health plans or disability insurance. As a single parent, you may find the payout from a critical illness insurance policy especially helpful for paying for extra childcare or lost income if you cannot work.

Accident insurance

Life is getting busier than ever – and there are more and more of us on the roads. Unfortunately, more people on the roads mean more accidents. If you buy accident insurance for yourself or your children, the payout from the policy can bring in some extra income at a critical time of need if any of you are in an accident. You can use an accident insurance payout to help pay for anything from lost income to private home care.

Life insurance

Life insurance is critical as a single parent as your children are dependent on your income. Generally, we suggest that you get a policy that is worth at least 10 times your annual income, but you may need more if you have a lot of debt or you need the money to last a long time.

Your children should be the beneficiaries of your policy and you can name a trustee (such as a grandparent or other relative) to look after the money on your children’s behalf until they reach a specified age.

We can help!

If you have questions about what kind of insurance is best for you, we’re happy to answer them! We’ll walk you through all your options and put together an insurance package that’s just right for you. Call us today!

Succession Planning for Business Owners

Succession Planning for Business Owners

Business owners deal with a unique set of challenges. One of these challenges includes succession planning. A succession plan is the process of the transfer of ownership, management and interest of a business. When should a business owner have a succession plan? A succession plan is required through the survival, growth and maturity stage of a business. All business owners, partners and shareholders should have a plan in place during these business stages.

We created this infographic checklist to be used as a guideline highlighting main points to be addressed when starting to succession plan.

Needs:

  • Determine your objectives- what do you want? For you, your family and your business. (Business’ financial needs)

  • What are your shares of the business worth? (Business value)

  • What are your personal financial needs- ongoing income needs, need for capital (ex. pay off debts, capital gains, equitable estate etc.)

There are 2 sets of events that can trigger a succession plan: controllable and uncontrollable.

Controllable events

Sale: Who do you sell the business to?

  • Family member

  • Manager/Employees

  • Outside Party

  • There are advantages and disadvantages for each- it’s important to examine all channels.

Retirement: When do you want to retire?

  • What are the financial and psychological needs of the business owner?

  • Is there enough? Is there a need for capital to provide for retirement income, redeem or freeze shares?

  • Does this fit into personal/retirement plan? Check tax, timing, corporate structures, finances and family dynamics. (if applicable)

Uncontrollable Events

Divorce: A disgruntled spouse can obtain a significant interest in the business.

  • What portion of business shares are held by the spouse?

  • Will the divorced spouse consider selling their shares?

  • What if the divorced spouse continues to hold interest in the business without understanding or contributing to the business?

  • If you have other partners/shareholders- would they consider working with your divorced spouse?

Illness/Disability: If you were disabled or critically ill, would your business survive?

  • Determine your ongoing income needs for you, your spouse and family. Is there enough? If there is a shortfall, is there an insurance or savings program in place to make up for the shortfall amount?

  • Will the ownership interest be retained, liquidated or sold?

  • How will the business be affected? Does the business need capital to continue operating or hire a consultant or executive? Will debts be recalled? Does the business have a savings or insurance program in place to address this?

Death: In the case of your premature death, what would happen to your business?

  • Determine your ongoing income needs for your dependents. Is there enough? If there is a shortfall, is there an insurance or savings program in place to make up for the shortfall amount?

  • Will the ownership interest be retained, liquidated or sold by your estate? Does your will address this? Is your will consistent with your wishes? What about taxes?

  • How will the business be affected? Does the business need capital to continue operating or hire a consultant or executive? Will debts be recalled? How will this affect your employees? Does the business have a savings or insurance program in place to address this?

Execution: It’s good to go through this with but you need to get a succession plan done.  Besides having a succession plan, make sure you have an estate plan and buy-sell/shareholders’ agreement.

Because a succession plan is complex, we suggest that a business owner has a professional team to help. The team should include:

  • Financial Planner/Advisor (CFP)

  • Succession Planning Specialist

  • Insurance Specialist

  • Lawyer

  • Accountant/Tax Specialist

  • Chartered Life Underwriter (CLU)

Next steps…

  • Contact us about helping you get your succession planning in order so you can gain peace of mind that your business is taken care of.

Life Insurance after 60- is it necessary?

You may have had life insurance for as long as you can remember. You wanted to make sure that your family would be taken care of and be able to pay their bills if anything happened to you.

But now that you’re older and your children are grown – and hopefully your mortgage is paid off – you may not feel you still need life insurance. This could be a valid assumption; however, there are some circumstances under which it may still make sense for you to have life insurance. They are:

  • You still have substantial debt.

  • You have dependent children or grandchildren.

  • You want to leave a financial legacy.

You still have substantial debt

No one likes the thought of leaving their loved ones to pay their debts if they die. If, however, someone has co-signed a loan with you – for example, for a mortgage or a car – and you die, then they will be on the hook for the entire amount.

If you have life insurance and name your co-signer as the beneficiary, this will help relieve any financial burden your death could cause them.

You have dependent children or grandchildren

If you have children who are still dependent on you because they have a mental or physical disability, life insurance can be an excellent way to ensure they will still have access to funds after you die.  Lifelong care can be expensive, and a life insurance benefit will go a long way to helping fund it.

You may have grandchildren you are caring for or that you are not responsible for but want to leave money they can use towards higher
education.  A life insurance payout can be a great way to help a grandchild get a good start in life without having to go into debt.

You want to leave a financial legacy

You may not have dependent children or grandchildren but still want to leave them something when you die. Life insurance can be a great way to do this without cutting back on your spending during your lifetime.

Life insurance can also help make sure that you have something to leave everyone in your will. If you have a family cottage, it can
be complicated to leave it to more than one person or family. Life insurance gives you the option to leave one person or family the cottage and another person or family the cash equivalent.

We can help you!

If you’re unsure whether or not it still makes sense to have life insurance after the age of 60, we’d be happy to sit down with you and talk through your options. Give us a call or email us today!

Group Insurance vs Individual Life Insurance

Group Insurance vs Individual Life Insurance

“I already have life insurance from work, so why do I need to get it personally?” or “Work has got me covered, I don’t need it.”

While it’s great to have group coverage from your employer or association, in most cases, people don’t understand that there are important differences when it comes to group life insurance vs. self owned life insurance.

Before counting on insurance from your group benefits plan, please take the time to understand the difference between group owned life insurance and personally owned life insurance. The key differences are ownership, premium, coverage, beneficiary and portability.

Ownership:

  • Self: You own and control the policy.

  • Group: The group owns and controls the policy.

Premium:

  • Self: Your premiums are guaranteed at policy issue and discounts are available based on your health.

  • Group: Premiums are not guaranteed and there are no discounts available based on your health. The rates provided are blended depending on your group.

Coverage:

  • Self: You choose based on your needs.

  • Group: In a group plan, the coverage is typically a multiple of your salary. If your coverage is through an association, then it’s usually a flat basic amount.

Beneficiary:

  • Self: You choose who your beneficiary is and they can choose how they want to use the insurance benefit.

  • Group: You choose who your beneficiary is and they can choose how they want to use the insurance benefit.

Portability:

  • Self: Your policy stays with you.

  • Group: Your policy is tied to your group and if you leave your employer or your association, you may need to reapply for insurance.

Talk to us, we can help you figure out what’s best for your situation.

Do you REALLY need life insurance?

You most likely do, but the more important question is, What kind? Whether you’re a young professional starting out, a devoted parent or a successful CEO, securing a life insurance policy is probably one of the most important decisions you will have to make in your adult life. Most people would agree that having financial safety nets in place is a good way to make sure that your loved ones will be taken care of when you pass away. Insurance can also help support your financial obligations and even take care of your estate liabilities. The tricky part, however, is figuring out what kind of life insurance best suits your goals and needs. This quick guide will help you decide what life insurance policy is best for you, depending on who needs to benefit from it and how long you’ll need it. 

Permanent or Term? 

Life insurance can be classified into two principal types: permanent or term. Both have different strengths and weaknesses, depending on what you aim to achieve with your life insurance policy. 

Term life insurance provides death benefits for a limited amount of time, usually for a fixed number of years. Let’s say you get a 30-year term. This means you’ll only pay for each year of those 30 years. If you die before the 30-year period, then your beneficiaries shall receive the death benefits they are entitled to. After the period, the insurance shall expire. You will no longer need to pay premiums, and your beneficiaries will no longer be entitled to any benefits.

Term life insurance is right for you if you are: 

  • The family breadwinner. Death benefits will replace your income for the years that you will have been working, in order to support your family’s needs.

  • A stay-at-home parent. You can set your insurance policy term to cover the years that your child will need financial support, especially for things that you would normally provide as a stay-at-home parent, such as childcare services.

  • A divorced parent. Insurance can cover the cost of child support, and the term can be set depending on how long you need to make support payments.

  • A mortgagor. If you are a homeowner with a mortgage, you can set up your term insurance to cover the years that you have to make payments. This way, your family won’t have to worry about losing their home.

  • A debtor with a co-signed debt. If you have credit card debt or student loans, a term life insurance policy can cover your debt payments. The term can be set to run for the duration of the payments. 

  • A business owner. If you’re a business owner, you may need either a term or permanent life insurance, depending on your needs. If you’re primarily concerned with paying off business debts, then a term life insurance may be your best option. 

Unlike term life insurance, a permanent life insurance does not expire. This means that your beneficiaries can receive death benefits no matter when you die. Aside from death benefits, a permanent life insurance policy can also double as a savings plan. A certain portion of your premiums can build cash value, which you may “withdraw” or borrow for future needs. You can do well with a permanent life insurance policy if you: 

  • …Have a special needs child. As a special needs child will most likely need support for health care and other expenses even as they enter adulthood. Your permanent life insurance can provide them with death benefits any time within their lifetime.

  • …Want to leave something for your loved ones. Regardless of your net worth, permanent life insurance will make sure that your beneficiaries receive what they are entitled to. If you have a high net worth, permanent life insurance can take care of estate taxes. Otherwise, they will still get even a small inheritance through death benefits.

  • …Want to make sure that your funeral expenses are covered. Final expense insurance can provide coverage for funeral expenses for smaller premiums.

  • …Have maximized your retirement plans. As permanent life insurance may also come with a savings component, this can also be used to help you out during retirement.

  • …Own a business. As mentioned earlier, business owners may need either permanent or term, depending on their needs.

A permanent insurance policy can help pay off estate taxes, so that the successors can inherit the business worry-free. Different people have different financial needs, so there is no one-sized-fits-all approach to choosing the right insurance policy for you. Talk to us now, and find out how a permanent or term life insurance can best give you security and peace of mind.